Cherries Coming Thursday, June 21st

Greetings!
The weather’s fine in Orondo and our lovely big Tieton cherries will be here Thursday the 21st. Some of you have already placed your orders and are on the list. Co-op Members who waited to pre-order should send me your case orders now by following the instructions below. The price is $90, same as last year. We’ll reserve a few boxes to sell by the pound in our store for those who can’t use a whole case.
Cherries keep well for three weeks in the fridge if they are stored closed in their original plastic bag so you’ll have some for the Fourth of July. You can freeze a few, pit and all, for a special treat in the dark days of winter. A couple of sweet mouthfuls of half-thawed giant cherries are very special.

Tieton cherries — first tree fruit of the season

Your household membership entitles you to special order tree fruit from Brian’s and Maria’s small orchard in Orondo, as we have been doing since 2009. If you would like to pre-order one or two cases of Tieton Cherries for delivery June 21, please place your order with me on my personal email: ehartmann7@gmail.com, following the instructions below.
— Eleanor Hartmann
PRE-ORDER INSTRUCTIONS
1. ORDERING
To order cherries, please contact me no later than the end of the afternoon on Tuesday, June 19, for delivery on Thursday June 21.  About 30 cases will be available, first come, first served.
To order, please email me, Eleanor: ehartmann7@gmail.com. No orders are taken through the Co-op. Your email should have “cherries” in the subject line and contain the following information:
  • Your name and phone number
  • How many cases of cherries you want (1 or 2)
Once you have sent your request and are on the list, your order is committed. I’ll send a confirmation email to everyone when orders are closed. If you find that you must cancel, please do so before the Tuesday order deadline so Maria doesn’t pack your fruit.
2. PICKUP
Your cherries will be available for pickup before noon on June 21.  You must pick up your fruit on Thursday before the store closes at 6 pm so that you can get them home and in the fridge. We have no cold storage and our store gets warm overnight; your cherries would suffer. If you can’t pick them up yourself, please arrange for a friend to fetch them for you and keep them cool overnight.
3. PAYMENT AND CHECKOUT
Payments will be taken at the check stand when you pick up your cherries. The price is $90cash or check only please; no credit or debit cards for special orders. The cashier will have the list of orders and will check your name off when you pay and take your fruit.
Enjoy your Cherries!
About the Farm
Brian and Maria Dennis have a ten acre farm south of Chelan on the Columbia River at lee side of the mountains where there is little pesticide drift from the commercial orchards. They are third generation orchardists and have grown tree fruit there for 35 years. They are good stewards of the land and use healthy agricultural practices. Maria has been delivering their wonderful fruit to our co-op from June through November since 2009. We get their fruit fresh from the farm so it is weeks fresher than fruit that has been long stored and much handled. It is available as it ripens on the trees and is harvested.
Thank you for supporting the people who work so hard on their small family farms to grow, harvest, and deliver our local and regional foods!

Amish Rhubarb Custard Pie, ala Hannah

My sister made this yummy pie for us this weekend while she and her family were up for a visit. It might be the best rhubarb pie I’ve ever had.  Feel free to use any pie crust recipe you wish, or you can select a nice prepared pie shell.  5b’s Gluten Free Pie Crust is very good – you can find it in our freezer section.   Or… use Anna’s favorite pie crust recipe found at end of this post.

Continue reading “Amish Rhubarb Custard Pie, ala Hannah”

Nettle Pesto

PrepTime: 25 minutes

Makes: 1 generous cup

Ingredients

1/2 pound nettles

4 large garlic cloves, smashed

1/2 cup toasted  nuts (your choice)

1/2 teaspoon salt

Freshly ground pepper

1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

1 1/4 cups extra virgin olive oil

1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Instructions

Bring a large pot of salted water to a simmer. Add the nettles directly from their bag and cook, stirring continuously, for 2 minutes (this denatures their sting). Dump into a colander to drain.  Or, you can use the nettles raw (the pulverizing in the processor will also denature their sting).

When the nettles are cool enough to handle, wrap them in a clean dishtowel and wring out as much moisture as possible.

In a food processor, whirl the garlic, nuts, salt, and pepper to taste until finely chopped.

Add nettles and lemon juice and whirl until finely chopped. With the machine running, add the oil and process until smooth. Add the cheese, pulse briefly, and season to taste with additional salt, pepper, or lemon juice.

Submitted by Kai, Adapted from https://jessthomson.wordpress.com

 

Raw Beet and Feta Salad

Ingredients

1 medium red or Chioggia beet, raw

1 golden beet, raw

2 carrots, raw

4-8 ounces of feta

½ cup raisins

2 tablespoons each olive oil and balsamic vinegar

Optional, chopped green onions

 

Directions

Grate root veggies using large side of the grater.  Place veggies in large bowl and toss.  Mix in raisins, feta, and green onions.  Whisk together oil and vinegar.  Drizzle oil mixture over salad and toss.  Keeps well in fridge for several days.

Submitted by Anna

 

Dijon Rack of Lamb

a la Valdi:

Coat lamb with Dijon Mustard. Then coat with bread crumbs.  Roast at 325 for about 45 minutes or until meat thermometer reads 170 degrees or shorter for medium(160 degrees) or medium-rare(145 degrees).

 

a la Anna:

Coat lamb with Dijon Mustard.  Sprinkle and rub with herbs and salt.  The San Juan Blend from San Juan Island Sea Salt is yummy.  Then finish with a light drizzle of balsamic vinegar.   Roast at 325 for about 45 minutes or until meat thermometer reads 170 degrees or shorter for medium(160 degrees) or medium-rare(145 degrees).

Submitted by Valdi and Anna

 

 

Sautéed Fennel

This is a tasty side, great served with fish or chicken, or just on it’s own!

Slice fennel lengthwise

Slice equal amount onions, thin half rounds

Sauté in butter on medium heat.

Add a pinch of sugar if you want a more caramelized effect.

Add a bit of salt & pepper if you wish.  

Finish with a dash of white wine or other liquid, and cook for a few more minutes. When it begins to turn light golden brown it is ready.

Use the green feathery dill like part of the fennel chopped up and sprinkle on top after it is cooked, if desired.

Submitted by Valdi.

Pan seared Hanging Tender

Marinade Ingredients
1/2 tbsp cumin
1/2 tbsp black pepper
1 tbsp garlic salt
1 tbsp onion salt
4oz balsamic vinager
4 oz tamari sauce
1 c Worcester sauce

Whisk together marinade ingredients in large bowl, pour over meat and marinate in refrigerator for 3-6 hours. This marinade and process will work well with other boneless steaks, such as flank, sirloin, flat iron, and even New York.

Hanging Tender is best cooked on a hot grill for short time, served medium rare.

Let meat rest for a few minutes after grilling then slice into thin strips on the diagonal, as you would with London Broil.

Serve with greens, carrots, and rice or quinoa.

Submitted by Valdi, augmented by Anna

 

 

Horseradish – How To

Horseradish is a member of the mustard family with a thick white root that when grated provides a condiment with distinctive flavor and heat. Grated horseradish can be used by itself as an accompaniment to prime rib, steak and other meats or it can be blended with lemon juice and mayonnaise to make a somewhat milder and creamier condiment.  It can also be added to sauces, mashed potatoes or potato salad.

Spice up your Thanksgiving cranberry relish this year by trying Mama Stamberg’s recipe below.

When working with horseradish root it is best to wear food handling gloves as you would with hot peppers and keep your eyes and nose an arm’s length away. To prepare horseradish from the raw root remove the outer layer of skin with a paring knife or vegetable peeler.Use a vegetable grater to create raw grated flakes to serve with steaks or roasts.  To create a creamed horseradish, chop the tuber into pieces and place in a food processor. Add either 1 Tbsp of vinegar and a pinch of salt, or 1 Tbsp of lemon juice and 2 – 3 Tbsp of mayonnaise. Blend and transfer the mixture to a jar and store in the refrigerator. Will keep for 3 – 4 weeks.

 

Mama Stamberg’s Cranberry Relish

Ingredients

2 cups whole raw cranberries, washed

1 small onion

3/4 cup sour cream

1/2 cup sugar

2 tablespoons fresh grated horseradish

 

Directions

Grind the raw berries and onion together. (“I use an old-fashioned meat grinder,” says Stamberg. “I’m sure there’s a setting on the food processor that will give you a chunky grind — not a puree.”)

Add everything else and mix.

Put in a plastic container and freeze.

Early Thanksgiving morning, move it from freezer to refrigerator compartment to thaw. (“It should still have some little icy slivers left.”)

The relish will be thick, creamy, and shocking pink. (“OK, Pepto Bismol pink. It has a tangy taste that cuts through and perks up the turkey and gravy. Its also good on next-day turkey sandwiches, and with roast beef.”)

Makes 1 1/2 pints.

 

Submitted by Peg, information sourced from www.horseradish.org

 

Mama Stamberg’s Cranberry Relish

Ingredients

2 cups whole raw cranberries, washed

1 small onion

3/4 cup sour cream

1/2 cup sugar

2 tablespoons fresh grated horseradish

 

Directions

Grind the raw berries and onion together. (“I use an old-fashioned meat grinder,” says Stamberg. “I’m sure there’s a setting on the food processor that will give you a chunky grind — not a puree.”)

Add everything else and mix.

Put in a plastic container and freeze.

Early Thanksgiving morning, move it from freezer to refrigerator compartment to thaw. (“It should still have some little icy slivers left.”)

The relish will be thick, creamy, and shocking pink. (“OK, Pepto Bismol pink. It has a tangy taste that cuts through and perks up the turkey and gravy. Its also good on next-day turkey sandwiches, and with roast beef.”)

Makes 1 1/2 pints.

 

Submitted by Peg, information sourced from www.horseradish.org

 

Easy Lamb Shank Dinner x2

My favorite way to enjoy lamb shanks is ROASTED slowly & lowly at 325 degrees for about 40 minutes per pound.  In a medium bowl, toss together garlic granules, freshly ground sea salt & pepper, and herbs de Provence and rub the seasoning mixture onto the shanks.  Place in a roasting pan, fatty side up, and cook till done.  Serve with rice or quinoa and a green salad topped with olives & feta.  -Anna

 

This is how I like my lamb shank.  Season meat with salt and pepper, roast in Dutch oven. When the meat is nice and brown, add chopped carrots, parsnips, onions and crimini mushrooms and roast for 15 min.  Then add almost half bottle red wine, tablespoon tomato paste, bay leaf, sprig of thyme and braise for another 45 min.  Serve with sweet and sour red cabbage, mashed potatoes and green peas.  -Valdi