Sciabica Olive Oils


Back on our shelves by popular demand: Sciabica extra virgin olive oils. Grown in the heart of California, these oils are crafted by the oldest family-run olive mill in the country. Nick Sciabica was also the first to bottle by varietal – just like wine grapes, olives have different flavor nuances that are characteristic of variety, time of harvest, and location of the orchard.

We have stocked several varietals as well as some lovely flavored oils, which are made by pressing olives with the flavoring ingredient.

The shelf life of a good-quality oil is generally considered one year, though after that length of time, unless it was mistreated, it still won’t be bad, it just won’t have quite as much depth of flavor. The good news is, the new Sciabica bottles are now tinted to protect against UV lighting (the destroyers of oil are air, light heat, and age.)

The more likely problem comes once the bottle has opened. Don’t keep it right by the stove where it will get hot, and don’t let it sit in your cupboard “saving it” for special occasions, allowing it to go rancid. The new bottles have a spout that helps protect against air intake, but you can – and should – use the oil in every aspect of cooking and baking:

  • Substitute oil for some or all of the butter in baking recipes; depending on the recipe’s method, it will decrease the saturated fat content, as well as lower the fat content because you don’t need as much oil as you do butter.
  • Use flavored oils to impart subtle flavor nuances; the lemon and orange oils are delicious in quick breads, pancakes, muffins, etc. The jalapeño oil adds the peppery spice without the heat; Lime Oil is lovely on grilled chicken, fish tacos, grilled sweet potatoes, fresh corn and other south-of-the-border preparations;
  • There’s nothing better than frying an island egg in lemon olive oil
  • Drizzle Basil Olive Oil or Sevillano Fall over heirloom tomatoes.
  • Douse freshly made popcorn or steamed potatoes with Manzanillo Fall instead of butter
  • Toss roasted sweet potatoes, carrots, or beets in Orange Oil with a pinch of cayenne or nutmeg.
  • Mix extra virgin olive oil with butter for higher heat applications like sautéing to increase the smoke point. You will still have better flavor than if using refined oil.
  • The Lavender Oil is lovely spritzed on scones and quick breads. You’ll also find it in our personal care section – it does wonders for the skin as a moisturizer!

Which Varietal to Buy?

Here’s a primer on the three we have in stock:

  • Sevillano Fall Harvest variety has a smooth and full flavor, with hints of art=ichokes and fresh herbs. It captures the rich zest of newly-ripened green olives. This oil has garnered countless awards, and was the highest rated olive oil at World Olive Oil Day Competition in Lucca, Italy, even when stacked up next to the best Italian olive oils. Try it over fresh Thirsty Goose heirloom tomatoes or dip a hunk of Bakery San Juan multi-grain bread in it. This is a great olive oil to use in Italian pasta preparations.
  • Manzanillo Fall Harvest has a richer, more full-bodied and intense flavor, with a hint of peppery finish. It does particularly well with starchy foods, and will stand up to the hearty flavors of meats and whole grains; this one is also great for bread dipping.
  • Mission Spring Harvest has a lush, buttery flavor, with a delicate underlying touch of sweetness. Crafted from sun-ripened black olives, this brilliant golden oil is the choice when you want a heart-healthy or dairy-free butter replacer. This is also the choice for baking when you don’t want the additional flavors of infused oils.

How to Substitute Oil for Butter

For most cakes and pastry recipes where butter is not a major structural component (shortbread cookies or a butter and powdered sugar frosting for example,) you can substitute olive oil. Keep in mind, you’ll want to use a mild-flavored oil such as Mission Spring Harvest, Lemon or Orange.

Butter                                                                      Olive Oil

1 cup …………………………………………………………….. 3/4 cup

3/4 cup ………………………………………………………….. 1/2 cup + 1 Tbsp.

2/3 cup ………………………………………………………….. 1/2 cup

1/2 cup ………………………………………………………….. 1/4 cup + 2 Tbsp.

1/3 cup ………………………………………………………….. 1/4 cup

1/4 cup ………………………………………………………….. 3 Tbsp.

2 Tablespoon………………………………………………….. 1½ Tbsp.

1 Tablespoon…………………………………………………… 2 ¼ tsp.

1 teaspoon………………………………………………………. 3/4 tsp.

Stephanie Prima-Sarantopulos trained at U.C.Davis in olive oil tasting, and served many years on the California Olive Oil Master Taste Panel; she also judged at the Los Angeles County Fair, the largest olive oil competition in the country.

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