Valdi’s Icelandic Lamb Soup, a la Anna

We pulled this recipe out of the archives!  It’s a fall classic and we just happen to have all the ingredients that you’ll need.  It’s what’s for dinner tonight!

A couple of years ago when I was battling a nasty cold, Valdi brought the most delicious bowl of soup to the co-op for me.  It was the BEST soup I’d had in years… perfect for the fall and winter and it’s a great way to use up left-over lamb.  I like lean meat so leg of lamb or shoulder roast works well for me.  Valdi likes a lot more fat, he says it intensifies the flavor, so he uses more soup and rib bones and fattier left-over cuts. 

 

What you need:

2 – 3 packages of lamb bones and/or ribs (if you don’t have any left-over lamb, use 3-4 times as many packages of bones/ribs, as meaty as possible.)

1 – 2 cups diced carrots

1 – 2 cups diced parsnips or turnips

1 – 2 cups diced onion

2 – 4 cups chopped cabbage or kale

2 – 4 cups diced left-over lamb or a couple of steaks cooked and cut into cubes (or use 3-4 times as many soup bones and ribs in broth… so you have more of that meat to use)

1 scant cup rolled oats (I use thick rolled from the bulk bin)

Optional:  2 garlic cloves, chicken broth (I like Better than Bouillon)

 

What to do:

Fill large stock pot ¾ full of water

Add in bones, a pinch or two of salt, two stalks of celery, 2-3 carrots, a quartered onion, and a bay leaf (I also added two whole cloves of garlic, but Valdi doesn’t use garlic in his soup)

Bring to boil then turn down and simmer, uncovered, for two hours

For the first several minutes of cooking you’ll need to scoop off some icky looking foam.  I don’t know why it does this, I just scooped it off like Valdi instructed.

While the broth is simmering dice your veggies and meat

When the broth is done, strain out the bones and spent veggies, and pull meat from bones (if you want a lower-fat version, make sure to trim the fat from the meat and chill the broth for several hours so that you can skim off the fat).

Rinse stock pot then add broth back in, along with a few more cups of water or prepared broth, to fill stock pot ½ to ¾ full.  If adding more than three cups of water you’ll probably want to add some Better than Bullion (chicken base) so the broth isn’t too watery.

Bring broth to boil and add in all your veggies, meat, and oatmeal

Turn down to simmer for 20-30 minutes, add more liquid if needed

Add salt as needed

Recipe submitted by Anna, tweaked and adapted from Valdi’s family recipe

 

Mushroom Medley Bisque

Ingredients

About 1 pound of assorted fresh mushrooms (dry-brushed clean, stems cut off, caps thinly sliced)

1 tablespoon organic olive oil

1/4 lb organic butter, plus 1 tablespoon

1 medium yellow onion cut into 2 inch pieces

2 medium carrots cut into 2 inch pieces

2 stalks of celery cut into 2 inch pieces

1 – 2 teaspoons herbs de Provence

Sea Salt and freshly ground pepper

Herbs de Provence

1 teaspoon Better Than Bouillon Chicken or Mushroom base

2 cups finely chopped leeks (optional, mix with shallots or onions)

1/3 cup flour

1 cup white wine

1 cup milk (I use organic unsweetened almond milk)

1 cup organic heavy cream

½ cup finely chopped fresh parsley (optional)

 

Directions:

To make the stock heat olive oil and one tablespoon of butter in a large pot.  Add mushroom stems, onion, carrot, celery, 1 teaspoon of herbs de Provence, 1 teaspoon of salt, and ½ teaspoon of pepper.  Cook over medium heat for 15 minutes.  Add 8 cups of water and 1 teaspoon of bouillon base, reduce heat and simmer for another 30 minutes.  Cool slightly then strain and reserve broth.

Meanwhile, in another large stock pot, heat the ¼ lb butter and add the leeks.  Cook over medium heat for about 20 minutes, until the leeks begin to brown.  Then add the mushrooms and cook another 10 minutes until they begin to brown.  Mix in flour, 1 teaspoon of herbs de Provence, 1 teaspoon of salt, and ½ teaspoon of pepper to make a roux.  Cook for 1-2 minutes.  Add the white wine and cook for another couple of minutes, stirring constantly and scraping from the bottom of the pot.  Add the strained broth and bring to a boil.  Reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes.  Add milk, cream, and parsley and bring nearly to a boil, but not quite.

Serve piping hot with homemade biscuits and butter.

Recipe submitted by Anna.  Combined and Adapted from several online and print mushroom soup recipes.

 

 

 

 

Marie’s One Pot Meal Miso Soup

 This recipe serves 2

1)  Rinse, then soften 2 dried Shiitake Mushrooms in ½ cup boiling water (or you can use fresh mushrooms, and sauté to bring out flavor, then add as directed) 

2)  Bring 4-5 cups water to a boil, while you select your veggies and tofu.

#)  Put 2 Tablespoons miso in a bowl, add ½ cup water and blend with a spoon; set aside.

4)  Add the following to the simmering water as you Chop each one, moving down the list (substitute any veggies you want, adding according to cook time needed):

  • Onions or Shallots – Garlic too if you want more zing or have congestion
  • 1 stalk Celery
  • 1 Carrot
  • Tofu – in small cubes, not too much
  • Broccoli, Cabbage, Zucchini, Bok Choi as desired (1/4 – 1/2 cup of each)
  • Softened Shiitakes (squeeze them into the soak water and reserve the water)
  • Fresh Ginger root (about ½ inch peeled & grated)

 

5)  Toward the end of cooking, add 1 Tablespoon Sesame or Sunflower oil

 

 6)  Add the Shiitake water.

 

7)  At the end of cooking, add chopped scallions if you like, plus 1/4 teaspoon Toasted Sesame Oil.

8)  Turn off heat and immediately add the blended Miso and water to the soup.

 

Variation: Try using a few frozen potstickers or wontons to enhance the soup’s texture. Put them in toward the beginning (after the onions) so they have enough time to cook. I’ve also used thin rice noodles, which are prepped in another pot while you’re making the soup, then added at the end. In that case, use more water to start the soup. 

For a Meatso Miso, Anna adds cooked stir fry pork  and uses a light chicken stock instead of water in step #6. 

Recipe submitted and adapted by Marie

 

 

 

 

Valdi’s Icelandic Lamb Soup a la Anna

A couple of months ago when I was battling a nasty cold, Valdi brought the most delicious bowl of soup to the co-op for me.  It was the BEST soup I’ve had in years… perfect for the winter and we have just about everything you need at the co-op.  Also, it’s a great way to use up left-over lamb.  I like lean meat so leg of lamb or shoulder roast works well for me.  Valdi likes a lot more fat, he says it intensifies the flavor, so he uses more soup and rib bones and fattier left-over cuts.  To each his/her own.

What you need:

2 – 3 packages of lamb bones and/or ribs (if you don’t have any left-over lamb, use 3-4 times as many packages of bones/ribs, as meaty as possible)

1 – 2 cups diced carrots

1 – 2 cups diced parsnips or turnips

1 – 2 cups diced onion

2 – 4 cups chopped cabbage or kale

2 – 4 cups diced left-over lamb (or use 3-4 times as many soup bones and ribs in broth… so you have more of that meat to use)

1 scant cup rolled oats (I use thick rolled from the bulk bin)

Optional:  2 garlic cloves, chicken broth (I like Better than Bouillon)

 

What to do:

Fill large stock pot ¾ full of water

Add in bones, a pinch or two of salt, two stalks of celery, 2-3 carrots, a quartered onion, and a bay leaf (I also added two whole cloves of garlic, but Valdi doesn’t use garlic in his soup)

Bring to boil then turn down and simmer, uncovered, for two hours

For the first several minutes of cooking you’ll need to scoop off some icky looking foam.  I don’t know why it does this, I just scooped it off like Valdi instructed. 

While the broth is simmering dice your veggies and meat

When the broth is done, strain out the bones and spent veggies, and pull meat from bones (if you want a lower-fat version, make sure to trim the fat from the meat and chill the broth for several hours so that you can skim off the fat).

Rinse stock pot then add broth back in, along with a few more cups of water or prepared broth, to fill stock pot ½ to ¾ full.  If adding more than three cups of water you’ll probably want to add some Better than Bullion (chicken base) so the broth isn’t too watery. 

Bring broth to boil and add in all your veggies, meat, and oatmeal

Turn down to simmer for 20-30 minutes, add more liquid if needed

Add salt as needed

 

Recipe submitted by Anna, “translated”and adapted from Valdi’s family recipe

 

 

 

SIBYL’S BUTTERNUT SQUASH SOUP

butternut (or kabocha) squash
onion with butter for cooking
broth
sherry or brandy
half & half
1/2 dried chipotle pepper
(nutmeg)

Chop squash into big chunks, remove seeds, and steam so it’s easy to peel.  When cool enough to handle, peel. (I usually just stab the squash a couple times with a sharp knife and put it on a pan in a moderate oven till it’s soft; let it cool and remove the flesh for use.)

Cook onion in butter till transparent in a soup kettle.  Add squash, broth, cumin, black pepper, and about a half a chipotle pepper with the seeds removed, diced very fine (soak it first; it makes it easier to chop).  Adjust amounts of ingredients to suit the size of the squash.  Simmer until the squash is tender.

Puree the soup with an immersion blender, add a quarter to half a cup or so of dry sherry, and some half and half.  It should be neither too thick nor too thin.  I like a dash of nutmeg also.  Heat but do not boil.  Taste for salt; it doesn’t need much if your broth is salty.  A lump of butter can be added (very French).

A sprinkle of chopped chives looks nice, or minced green onion.

This soup can also be made with pumpkin, fresh or canned, and the chipotle pepper can be replaced with a bit of minced fresh ginger, and perhaps, a cinnamon stick.

Recipe created and submitted by Eleanor

Cabrito Chili (Goat Meat Chili)

Makes approximately 14 servings

 

2 cups chopped onion or 1 cup chopped shallot

2 tbls vegetable oil or olive oil

1 tbls ground oregano or fresh oregano if in season

2 tbls ground cumin

1 tsp minced garlic

2 tbls salt

3 lbs ground Snowberry Farm cabrito (goat burger)

½ cup + 2 tbls chili powder

½ cup flour

8 cups boiling water

 

In a heavy pot, sauté onions in cooking oil, add oregano, cumin, garlic, and salt.  Stir until onions are almost clear.  Add cabrito burger; cook and stir until cooked and crumbly.  Add chili powder and then flour, stirring until well blended.  Add boiling water.  Bring mixture back to boil, simmer for 45 minutes.  Adjust seasonings to taste.  Serve cooked beans as a side dish.  Nootka Rose Farm Agassi, Anasazi, or Black Turtle dry beans hold their shape beautifully.

Nutrition information per service:  173 calories (28.5% from fat), 21.7 protein, 5.5 g fat, 55 mg cholesterol, 5.1 mg iron, 456 mg sodium

Recipe adapted from the American Meat Goat Association, by Candace

Hoppin’ John

Soak beans (black-eyed peas) overnight and drain, although this is not strictly necessary. In a capacious pot add the rinsed beans, fresh water, a chopped onion, bay leaf, thyme, and a smoked ham hock. Simmer long and as slowly as possible until the beans are toothsome. Remove the hock, finely shred and return to the pot. Add a little salt and pepper and some rice, with a little more water if necessary and cook about 20 minutes longer until rice is cooked through. Garnish with unspeakable quantities of hot sauce and, for the effete, a flourish of parsley or other such nonsense. If you are in a Creole mood substitute red beans and say “red beans and ricely yours” and pretend you’re Louis Armstrong.

by Ken Abala, from “Beans: A History”

Rhubarb Koresh

Ingredients:

1 – 1 1/2 pounds (more or less) chopped rhubarb

1 1/2 pounds of meat (lamb or beef) for stew: kabobs, stew, cut sirloin; or short ribs or lamb neck bones, braised until meat falls from bones, then cut into bite-size chunks. Leftover lamb or beef roast works well also.

1 large onion, chopped (substitute a shallot if shopping at the co-op)

A couple pinches saffron if you have some

1/2 teaspoon turmeric

Salt and pepper to taste

1 bunch of parsley, chopped without tough stems (about 2 cups, packed)

1 bunch of mint leaves, chopped (about 1 cup, packed)

2 tablespoons sugar or to taste (or a bit of baking soda will cut the acid, with less sugar); or, if you like tart, add lemon juice

Oil or butter

Water

 

Preparation:

1. Heat 2-3 tablespoons of oil in a heavy stew pot and saute chopped onions till translucent. Stir in turmeric, add the meat chunks and brown. Add salt and pepper and saffron if you have some. Add water or stock to cover. Cook for an hour on medium to low heat with the lid on.

Alternatively, If using bony pieces, brown bones in oil, add salt and water or broth, and simmer two hours or until meat falls from bones; cut meat into chunks and return to the pot with the broth. Fry the onion and add turmeric and saffron as above. (If using leftover meat, fry the onions, stir turmeric and saffron into the pot, then add meat; cover with stock and bring up the heat. No further cooking of the meat required.)

2. Meanwhile saute chopped parsley and mint together in 2 tablespoons of oil or butter on medium heat. Add parsley and mint mixture to meat sauce half way through the cooking (or at the beginning if using braised or leftover meat). Add water if needed.

3. Gently saute chopped rhubarb in 2 tablespoons of oil or butter for 2-3 minutes on medium heat. Add the rhubarb to the pot, lower the heat to a gentle simmer and cook 15 minutes more.

4. Taste and add 2 tablespoons of sugar or to taste, or a bit of soda and less sugar if you prefer. Add lemon if you like. Stir and cook 5 minute longer.

Recipe adapted by Eleanor Hartmann

“ETHIOPIAN” RED LENTIL SOUP

red lentils–2 cups

tomato paste–1 small can, jar

onion & garlic & ginger

salt, pepper, paprika

 

Fry a couple of good sized onions, chopped, in big glug of olive oil (1/8 cup or more) in large soup kettle–slow and not too hot, till onion is transparent but not brown.

 

Meanwhile, soak two cups of red lentils.

 

When the onions are golden and transparent, add a can of tomato paste, the rinsed and drained lentils, and about a quart of water (add more as needed).  Add five or more cloves of chopped garlic and minced fresh ginger (a lump the size of the last digit of your thumb).

 

Finally stir in a tablespoon of paprika and a teaspoon of black pepper. Simmer slowly for about forty-five minutes stirring occasionally and adding water as needed; the soup is medium thick but not stiff.  Toward the end, add salt (it can tolerate a tablespoon or more, but start easy and taste as you go).

 

I have served it with a lemon or lime wedge and/or with a dollop of lebni, sour cream or thick yogurt.  A scatter of green herbs is pleasant if you have it–cilantro, parsley, chives, or fresh basil.

 

This makes a big pot of soup, but it’s keeps well and is good to have on hand for family or visitors. Actually in my house it doesn’t last 24 hours….

 

Recipe a la Eleanor

LENTIL LEEK SHITAKE SOUP

(this soup works well as a vegan soup)

 

lentils

leeks

fresh shitake mushrooms

oil or butter

herbs, salt & pepper, soy sauce, balsamic vinegar

 

Cook up a pint of lentils in water, more than a quart (add more asneeded)–1/2 – 3/4 hour.

Meanwhile, cut a couple of leeks in half lengthwise, wash them thoroughly in a sinkful of water, and chop crosswise, all the way through the green, into quarter-inch strips.  Fry the leek gently in a big lump of butter or fine olive oil (sesame oil would be excellent, I think); allow some of it to brown lightly, even caramelize onto the pan a bit.

Dump in the cooked lentils and enough weak vegetable broth or water to make it soupy.  Season with a generous shake of cumin (up to a tablespoon), Italian herbs, and pepper.  Dump in a small glug of soysauce and a small squirt of balsamic vinegar.  A little dry sherry or brandy is very good.

At the end, quickly fry up a mess of shitakes in butter or oil and put them in the soup. I cut them like a pie into eight or ten wedges, including the stems.  Ordinary mushrooms can be used instead, though they don’t have the same exquisite fragrance.

This makes a family size pot of soup with some left for lunch.

Recipe a la Eleanor