Health Benefits of Fruit, from Maria


Health Benefits: The red pigments in cherries contain natural anthocyanins. Anthocyanins are anti-inflammatory pain relievers In fact, 20 cherries are 10 times stronger than aspirin or ibuprofen and have positive effects on gout and arthritis pain.
 They help shut down the enzymes that cause tissue inflammation in the first place. Anthocyanins found in cherries also block inflammatory enzymes, reducing pain. There is also evidence that cherries are so powerful they may reduce the risk of cancer by fifty percent. Cherries may provide antioxidant protection comparable to commercially available supplements, such as vitamin E and vitamin C. In addition to being rich in potassium, vitamin C, and B complex, research has shown that cherry consumption can help the body prevent heart disease and cancer, as well as provide pain relief and improved bone health. These health benefits are possible due to the antioxidants found in cherries, the most vital of which are the flavonoids anthocyanins and quercetin, and the phenolic acid amygdalin.
 According to researchers, a flavonoid found in cherries that has anticarcinogenic properties called quercetin can help to prevent heart disease. Cherries are considered a nutritionally significant source of quercetin, containing large quantities per serving that surpass most fruits.
 A phenolic acid called amygdalin, also termed Vitamin B17 and laetrile, found in the kernels of cherries and other fruits, has been shown to reduce tumor size and further spread of cancer, as well as to alleviate the pains of the cancerous process. Populations such as the Hunza in Pakistan that have always incorporated amygdalin into their diets have remained cancer free, leading scientists to believe that its consumption could also be a powerful cancer prevention food.
 Sweet cherries are also considered to be excellent sources of boron. Boron consumption, coupled with calcium and magnesium has been linked to increased bone health. Boron is also known to boost estrogen levels in postmenopausal women, stimulate the brain, and aid in prevention of osteoporosis.
Tart cherries naturally pack a health-promoting punch that provides pain relief for many consumers. Ongoing research shows that tart cherries are a rich source of antioxidants, including melatonin, which may help to relieve the pain of arthritis, gout, and possibly fibromyalgia. To date, no other fruit or vegetable has been found to have the pain relieving properties of tart cherries. In addition, the antioxidants in tart cherries can help fight cancer and heart disease.

Apples are an excellent source of dietary fiber, providing you with nearly 20% of your needs for the day. Because of about 25% of the fiber found in apples is soluble. The type of fiber may help reduce cholesterol by preventing it from being absorbed by the body and the carbohydrates are excellent source of long-term energy.

Peaches are an excellent source of Vitamin C and dietary fiber, providing you with nearly 20% of your needs for the day. The type of peach fiber may help reduce cholesterol by preventing it from being absorbed by the body. The dried peaches are very good in taste and delicious, full of potassium. Red-pigmented beta-carotene is a powerful member of the antioxidant family. Visible in the vibrant orange color of peaches, beta-carotene is transformed to vitamin A in the body.
 Vitamin A plays a crucial role in maintaining the skin, internally and externally, as well as in protecting the eyes, building strong teeth and bones and healthy hair. Additionally, research indicates that vitamin A has been linked to reduced rates of cancer and heart disease. Just one serving of Washington peaches contains six percent of the U.S. RDA for vitamins.
 Vitamin C boosts the immune system, promotes healing and helps prevent cancer, heart disease and stroke. This aggressive antioxidant is essential to optimum health and peaches can help. One half-cup serving of canned peaches contains eight percent of the U.S. RDA.
 Research indicates that vitamin E is particularly effective in preventing heart disease and breast cancer. While vitamin E is primarily found in vegetable oils, nuts, seeds and wheat germ, peaches contain a significant amount. In a study conducted by Ohio State University, one half-cup serving of canned peaches contributes up to 24% of the U.S. RDA for vitamin E.
 Peaches offer a source of carbohydrates, protein, dietary fiber, vitamin C and vitamin A. This nutritious fruit also contains boron, known to boost estrogen levels in postmenopausal women, stimulate the brain, and aid in prevention of osteoporosis. Boron consumption, coupled with calcium and magnesium has been linked to increased bone health.

Washington dried tomatoes have a sweet, intense tomato flavor, brilliant red color and chewy texture making them a good choice for use in cooking, sauce and salad preparations. Drying removes only the water from the tomato, which concentrates the tomato flavor and nutrients. Rich in vitamin A, B, C and a valuable source of iron, lycopene, potassium and phosphorus.

Pears offer an excellent source of vitamin A and C, and dietary fiber. Pears also contain phosphorus and pectin, a soluble fiber that helps you to control cholesterol levels and cellulose, an insoluble fiber that promotes normal bowel function.
Dried pears offer a good source of vitamin C, folate, and dietary fiber.
 Providing some iron and potassium.
The fresh version (plums) and the dried version (prunes) of the plant scientifically known as Prunus domestica have been the subject of repeated health research for their high content of unique phytonutrients called neochlorogenic and chlorogenic acid. These substances found in plums and prunes are classified as phenols, and their function as antioxidants has been well documented. Phytonutrients and antioxidants fight free radicals.

Apricots can help protect the heart and eyes, as well as provide the disease-fighting effects of fiber. The high beta-carotene and lycopene activity of apricots makes them important heart health foods. Both beta-carotene and lycopene protect LDL cholesterol from oxidation, which may help prevent heart disease.

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