Horseradish – How To


Horseradish is a member of the mustard family with a thick white root that when grated provides a condiment with distinctive flavor and heat. Grated horseradish can be used by itself as an accompaniment to prime rib, steak and other meats or it can be blended with lemon juice and mayonnaise to make a somewhat milder and creamier condiment.  It can also be added to sauces, mashed potatoes or potato salad.

Spice up your Thanksgiving cranberry relish this year by trying Mama Stamberg’s recipe below.

When working with horseradish root it is best to wear food handling gloves as you would with hot peppers and keep your eyes and nose an arm’s length away. To prepare horseradish from the raw root remove the outer layer of skin with a paring knife or vegetable peeler.Use a vegetable grater to create raw grated flakes to serve with steaks or roasts.  To create a creamed horseradish, chop the tuber into pieces and place in a food processor. Add either 1 Tbsp of vinegar and a pinch of salt, or 1 Tbsp of lemon juice and 2 – 3 Tbsp of mayonnaise. Blend and transfer the mixture to a jar and store in the refrigerator. Will keep for 3 – 4 weeks.

 

Mama Stamberg’s Cranberry Relish

Ingredients

2 cups whole raw cranberries, washed

1 small onion

3/4 cup sour cream

1/2 cup sugar

2 tablespoons fresh grated horseradish

 

Directions

Grind the raw berries and onion together. (“I use an old-fashioned meat grinder,” says Stamberg. “I’m sure there’s a setting on the food processor that will give you a chunky grind — not a puree.”)

Add everything else and mix.

Put in a plastic container and freeze.

Early Thanksgiving morning, move it from freezer to refrigerator compartment to thaw. (“It should still have some little icy slivers left.”)

The relish will be thick, creamy, and shocking pink. (“OK, Pepto Bismol pink. It has a tangy taste that cuts through and perks up the turkey and gravy. Its also good on next-day turkey sandwiches, and with roast beef.”)

Makes 1 1/2 pints.

 

Submitted by Peg, information sourced from www.horseradish.org

 

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