Mushroom Medley Bisque

Ingredients

About 1 pound of assorted fresh mushrooms (dry-brushed clean, stems cut off, caps thinly sliced)

1 tablespoon organic olive oil

1/4 lb organic butter, plus 1 tablespoon

1 medium yellow onion cut into 2 inch pieces

2 medium carrots cut into 2 inch pieces

2 stalks of celery cut into 2 inch pieces

1 – 2 teaspoons herbs de Provence

Sea Salt and freshly ground pepper

Herbs de Provence

1 teaspoon Better Than Bouillon Chicken or Mushroom base

2 cups finely chopped leeks (optional, mix with shallots or onions)

1/3 cup flour

1 cup white wine

1 cup milk (I use organic unsweetened almond milk)

1 cup organic heavy cream

½ cup finely chopped fresh parsley (optional)

 

Directions:

To make the stock heat olive oil and one tablespoon of butter in a large pot.  Add mushroom stems, onion, carrot, celery, 1 teaspoon of herbs de Provence, 1 teaspoon of salt, and ½ teaspoon of pepper.  Cook over medium heat for 15 minutes.  Add 8 cups of water and 1 teaspoon of bouillon base, reduce heat and simmer for another 30 minutes.  Cool slightly then strain and reserve broth.

Meanwhile, in another large stock pot, heat the ¼ lb butter and add the leeks.  Cook over medium heat for about 20 minutes, until the leeks begin to brown.  Then add the mushrooms and cook another 10 minutes until they begin to brown.  Mix in flour, 1 teaspoon of herbs de Provence, 1 teaspoon of salt, and ½ teaspoon of pepper to make a roux.  Cook for 1-2 minutes.  Add the white wine and cook for another couple of minutes, stirring constantly and scraping from the bottom of the pot.  Add the strained broth and bring to a boil.  Reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes.  Add milk, cream, and parsley and bring nearly to a boil, but not quite.

Serve piping hot with homemade biscuits and butter.

Recipe submitted by Anna.  Combined and Adapted from several online and print mushroom soup recipes.

 

 

 

 

Wild Chanterelle Mushroom & Parmesan Omelet

This is dead easy, not even a recipe really.

Whip up 6 farm fresh eggs.  Add a bit of cream, salt, and pepper and whip some more until frothy.

Over med-high heat cook ¼ cut chopped onion and 1-2 cups Chanterelle mushrooms (cut up into ½ inch pieces)in 1 tablespoon olive oil and 1 tablespoon butter.  Cook until mushrooms are just crisping on the edges.  Remove mushrooms & onion from pan.

Add in a bit more oil and butter to pan, wait a minute until pan and oil are very hot again then add egg mixture and let cook for about 4 minutes till egg is just about done.  To get top layer of egg cooked, slip spatula between egg and side of pan then tip pan so that uncooked egg slips into gap between spatula and pan.  Do this a few times in a few different locations around the pan.  Once egg is thoroughly cooked, spoon mushroom mixture and ¼ cup finely grated parmesan cheese over half of the egg.  Fold omelet over itself.  Remove from heat.  Let sit one minute, then divide into 2-3 slices and serve.

This is delicious with a cup of tomato soup or side salad.

Non-recipe submitted by Anna

Beef Marsala with Wild Chanterelle Mushrooms

Ingredients
Beef sliced into thin strips (about 1 1/2 pounds), I use New York steak or top sirloin
Flour, for dredging
Salt and black pepper
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil & 2 tablespoon butter (for cooking the meat)
1/2 pound Chanterelle mushrooms, cut into 1/2 inch pieces
1/2 cup sweet Marsala wine
1/2 cup beef, veggie, or chicken stock (I like Better Than Bullion chicken stock)
2 tablespoon butter
1/4 cup chopped parsley

Directions
Put some flour in a shallow platter and season with a fair amount of salt and pepper; mix with a fork to distribute evenly.

Heat the oil and butter over medium-high flame in a large skillet. When the oil is nice and hot, dredge both sides of the sliced beef in the seasoned flour, shaking off the excess. Slip the slices into the pan and fry for 3-5 minutes on each side until golden, turning once – do this in batches if the pieces don’t fit comfortably in the pan. Remove the beef to a large platter in a single layer to keep warm.

Lower the heat to medium and add the mushrooms and sauté until they are nicely browned, about 5 minutes. Add the Marsala to the pan and boil down for a minute to cook out the alcohol. Add the stock and simmer for a few minutes to reduce the sauce slightly. Stir in the butter and return the beef to the pan; simmer gently for 1 minute to heat the meat through. Season with salt and pepper and garnish with chopped parsley before serving.

Serve over pasta or rice

Recipe submitted by Anna, pieced together from various Chicken Marsala recipes, adapted for beef

Spaghetti Carbonara with Arugula & Wild Chanterelles, or Spaghetti Carbon-Anna

Ingredients

1.5 pounds dry spaghetti
3 tablespoons olive oil, 2 tablespoons butter
½ pound bacon, sliced into small pieces
4 garlic cloves, crushed
2-3 large eggs
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese, plus more for serving
Freshly ground black pepper
1-2 cups fresh arugula, chopped
1-2 cups chopped chanterelle mushrooms

Directions

Bring salted water to boil in large pot.  This will be used for your pasta in just a little while.  Once water comes to a boil turn off heat and cover with lid, to hold heat until needed.  While water is coming to a boil do the following:

  • Grate 1+ cup of Parmesan cheese
  • Whisk together eggs and 1 cup grated parmesan cheese in a very large bowl until smooth and just a little frothy.  Let sit a room temp until pasta is done
  • Chop mushrooms and set aside
  • Chop Arugula and set aside
  • Slice bacon into small cubes or into small thin strips

In a skillet, sauté chanterelle mushrooms over med-high heat in 2 tablespoons butter and 1 tablespoon olive oil until mushrooms just begin to crisp.  Transfer mushrooms to a bowl.

Then… add 2 more tablespoons of olive oil and bacon to the skillet and cook bacon to your liking, adding crushed garlic for the last two minutes of cooking.  Drain off some, all, or none of the fat – totally up to you.  Traditional Carbonara uses all the bacon fat, but I like to drain most of the fat and replace it with a couple of tablespoons of olive oil.  To each her own.

While bacon is cooking bring pasta water back to a boil, add the pasta and cook according to directions or until tender yet firm (as they say in Italian “al dente.”). Drain the pasta well, but very quickly, reserving 1/2 cup of the starchy cooking water to use in the “sauce” if you wish.

Immediately transfer the boiling hot pasta to the large bowl with whisked egg & cheese mixture.  Toss pasta into the mixture.  This cooks the egg and provides a unique light and creamy sauce.  Add some of the hot pasta water if you need to make the sauce a bit saucier.  As soon as egg is cooked add mushrooms, bacon (with fat or olive oil in its place), and arugula.  Toss quickly to incorporate those ingredients and serve immediately with a little pepper and parmesan sprinkled over the top.

Note:  It is very important that the pasta is hot when adding the egg mixture, so that the heat of the pasta cooks the raw eggs.

Recipe submitted by Anna, pieced together from several sources, and then re-created to highlight local & offerings at the co-op.

THE CASCADIAN’S GUIDE TO COOKING THE BEST SPECIALTY MUSHROOMS

DON’T CROWD THE MUSHROOMS!

This is one of the key techniques for cooking mushrooms that taste great every time. Cooking the mushrooms on their own ensures that you get the best flavor profile and texture from your fungi friends. A dry saute works well for mushrooms that are moist and very fresh; try it: Heat a cast iron or other skillet to medium-high heat. Chop up your mushrooms as you normally do. Throw the chopped mushrooms into the heated pan and stir occasionally. In a minute or two they will begin to release their water. Keep stirring and cooking for a few minutes until the mushrooms begin to brown a bit and the water is gone. Now it’s time for the butter and garlic! Use whatever fat you are cooking with to brown the mushrooms, and to bring out their flavor add a pinch of salt to taste. If your mushrooms have been stored for a time and are slightly dry, add a cup of water to the skillet at the beginning and let that water cook off before you dry saute as above. Continue reading “THE CASCADIAN’S GUIDE TO COOKING THE BEST SPECIALTY MUSHROOMS”

LENTIL LEEK SHITAKE SOUP

(this soup works well as a vegan soup)

 

lentils

leeks

fresh shitake mushrooms

oil or butter

herbs, salt & pepper, soy sauce, balsamic vinegar

 

Cook up a pint of lentils in water, more than a quart (add more asneeded)–1/2 – 3/4 hour.

Meanwhile, cut a couple of leeks in half lengthwise, wash them thoroughly in a sinkful of water, and chop crosswise, all the way through the green, into quarter-inch strips.  Fry the leek gently in a big lump of butter or fine olive oil (sesame oil would be excellent, I think); allow some of it to brown lightly, even caramelize onto the pan a bit.

Dump in the cooked lentils and enough weak vegetable broth or water to make it soupy.  Season with a generous shake of cumin (up to a tablespoon), Italian herbs, and pepper.  Dump in a small glug of soysauce and a small squirt of balsamic vinegar.  A little dry sherry or brandy is very good.

At the end, quickly fry up a mess of shitakes in butter or oil and put them in the soup. I cut them like a pie into eight or ten wedges, including the stems.  Ordinary mushrooms can be used instead, though they don’t have the same exquisite fragrance.

This makes a family size pot of soup with some left for lunch.

Recipe a la Eleanor

Ping Sha, Beef or Lamb with Mushrooms and Cellophane Noodles (Karen Vedder)

1 pound *shitake or white mushrooms cut into ½ inch strips

or 2cups dried shitake or porcini mushrooms

About 2.5 cups water

6-8 oz. Cellophane noodles (aka mung bean threads)

3 Tbsp. Peanut or canola oil

3 Tbsp. Minced ginger

2 scallions sliced lengthwise into ribbons then into 1.5 inch pieces

¾ – 1 pound lamb or beef cut into pices 1” x 2”

1 tsp. Salt

3 Tbsp. Soy sauce

1 cup broth or water

*1 bag of fresh spring greens (stir fry with ginger and scallions, increase cook time to 2-3 minutes)

 If using dried mushrooms soak covered in hot water for 15 minutes.  Drain keeping 1.5 cups water.  Slice into ¼ inch strips.  Set aside.

  1. Place noodles in wide bowl.  Pour hot water to cover and soak for 10 min. Drain and cut into long lengths.  12 inches or so.
  2. Heat skillet or wok.  Add 2 Tbsp. Oil and lower heat to medium-high.  Stir fry ginger and scallions for about a minute. Add meat and salt.  Sitr fry for about 2 minutes until meat changes color.  Remove to plate.
  3. Rinse wok with ½ cup water.  Save rinse water.  Add reserved mushroom water or another 1.5 cups water to reserved rinse water.
  4. Dry wok.  Return to medium high heat.  Add 1 Tbsp. Oil and stiry fry mushrooms for several minutes.  Press against side of pan until they start to soften and give off liquid.
  5. Add reserved water, cellophane noodles, and soy sauce and cooke for another minute.  Press noodles against hot pan.
  6. Add 1 cup broth and bring to a boil.  Boil hard for 1 minute then lower heat to medium and add reserved meat and flavorings.  Stiry to incorporate.  Adjust salt if necessary.
  7. Serve over rice.  Serves 4.

Recipe from Beyond the Wall – Recipes and travels in the other china by Jeffrey Alford and Naoimi Duguid   (The library has this wonderful cookbook)

 *suggested co-op substitutions or additions

Lentil Soup with Shitakes & Leeks

Ingredients:

lentils
leeks
fresh shitake mushrooms
oil or butter
herbs, salt & pepper, soy sauce, vinegar

Boil up a pint of lentils in a couple quarts of water–1/2 – 3/4 hour.

Meanwhile, cut a couple of leeks in half lengthwise, wash them thoroughly in a sinkful of water, and chop crosswise, all the way through the green, into quarter or half inch bits. In a big kettle, fry the leek gently in a big lump of butter or fine olive oil (sesame oil would be excellent, I think); allow some of it to brown lightly, even caramelize onto the pan a bit.

Dump in the cooked lentils and enough water or vegetable broth to make it soupy. Season with a generous shake of cumin (about half a tablespoon), Italian herbs, and pepper. Dump in a small glug of soysauce and a small squirt of balsamic vinegar. A little dry sherry is very good.

At the end, quickly fry up a mess of shitakes in butter or oil and put them in the soup. Shitakes are rather expensive, but half a dozen don’t weigh very much. I cut them like a pie into eight or ten wedges, including a bit of stem on most of the pieces. Ordinary mushrooms can be used instead, though they don’t have the same exquisite fragrance.

This makes a family size pot of soup with some left for lunch.

Shared by Eleanor